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In case you didn’t know it May is Motorcycle Awareness Month. Legislative and gubernatorial proclamations around the country have declared May as  Motorcycle Awareness Month. This is to remind everyone to share the road with motorcyclists and make a conscious effort to look for them. Motorcycle Awareness Month is an annual effort by the motorcycle interest groups, like the AMA, to watch out for motorcycles since in many states few motorcycles were on the road in the winter and early spring months.

“Motorcyclists take to the highways in large numbers every spring, and it’s the responsibility of all road users to acknowledge us safely and attentively,” said AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. “This is why many states and local governments officially promote motorcycle awareness during the month of May.

“Unfortunately, many road users are not always mindful of those with whom they share the road, and an annual reminder is helpful for them to recognize the flow of motorcycles in traffic, and make an extra efforts to watch for motorcycles,” Dingman said.

“One of the leading causes of motorcycle crashes is the fact that drivers don’t see motorcycles,” he said. “Simply put, drivers tell themselves to watch for cars, trucks, buses and pedestrians, but they don’t tell always themselves to watch for motorcycles. We want to change that.”

Here are 10 tips all drivers should know and understand to help make the road safer for bikers.

1 – Over half of all fatal motorcycle crashes involve another vehicle. Most of the time, the motorist, not the motorcyclist, is at fault. There are a lot more cars and trucks than motorcycles on the road, and some drivers don’t “recognize” a motorcycle – they ignore it (usually unintentionally).

2 – Because of its small size, a motorcycle can be easily hidden in a car’s blind spots (door/roof pillars) or masked by objects or backgrounds outside a car (bushes, fences, bridges, etc). Take an extra moment to look for motorcycles, whether you’re changing lanes or turning at intersections.

3 – A motorcycle may look farther away than it is. It may also be difficult to judge a motorcycle’s speed. When checking traffic to turn at an intersection or into (or out of) a driveway, predict a motorcycle is closer than it looks.

4 – Motorcyclists often slow by downshifting or merely rolling off the throttle, thus not activating the brake light. Allow more following distance, say three or four seconds. At intersections, predict a motorcyclist may slow down without visual warning.

5 – Motorcyclists often adjust position within a lane to be seen more easily and to minimize the effects of  road debris, passing vehicles, and wind. Understand that motorcyclists adjust lane position for a purpose, not to be reckless or show off or to allow you to share the lane with them.

6 – Turn signals on a motorcycle usually are not self-canceling, some riders (especially beginners) sometimes forget to turn them off after a turn or lane change. Make sure a motorcycle’s signal is for real.

7 – Maneuverability is one of a motorcycle’s better characteristics, especially at slower speeds and with good road conditions, but don’t expect a motorcyclist to always be able to dodge out of the way.

8 – Stopping distance for motorcycles is nearly the same as for cars, but slippery pavement makes stopping quickly difficult. Allow more following distance behind a motorcycle because it can’t always stop “on a dime.”

9 – When a motorcycle is in motion, see more than the motorcycle – see the person under the helmet, who could be your friend, neighbor, or relative.

10 – If a driver crashes into a motorcyclist, bicyclist, or pedestrian and causes serious injury, the driver would likely never forgive himself/herself.

Sources: AMA and MSF

Posted 11:26 AM  View Comments

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